Teachers & Awareness

youngatheartyoungatheart Posts: 6Member
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How would you like teachers to teach their students about spinal cord injuries? I have been teaching this in my class for the first time and I'm so happy I'm doing this. I teach grade 1. Many students will volunteer personal stories how they have family members that have spinal cord injuries and talk about them. What should I teach about? What questions? 

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  • jaarchjaarch Posts: 47Moderator Moderator
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    First off, I would ask them what questions they have and answer them to the best of my ability. I would probably explain to them how I can't feel anything below my level of injury and how easy it is to injure myself and not even know it. One of the best examples of how to describe what it feels like to be paralyzed is to have them put their hand down on a flat surface with only their ring finger extended and their other fingers folded into their hand. Then ask them to try to lift their ring finger. It's pretty accurate. Although there are some people out there that can do it so, It's not 100%. 
  • youngatheartyoungatheart Posts: 6Member
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    @jaarch thankyou for your post! My students have family members with spi and when we talk about it they just love talking about their family members! I want to teach them at an early age as much information as I can so they understand. Thankyou!:)
  • Monica.TMonica.T Posts: 98Member ✭✭
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    Young children are usually very open and honest with their questions, keeping the information provided to their age level will help to not overwhelm them with information they won't be able to fully understand (such as medical language). Telling or showing them that wheelchair users are very much like them, they just do things differently helps kids relate to the disabled person on a personal level. My son uses a feeding tube and younger kids have always thought it pretty cool that he doesn't have to taste his veggies or bad tasting medicine. Now that my son has become a wheelchair user my six year old grand-daughter has come to realize and accept that her "Choo-Choo" (what she calls my son) is still the same person he was before except now he requires the wheelchair to get around. She has even become quite the expert at wheeling herself around in his chair. Kids also like being helpful, being told they can't 'help' often misleads smaller children into thinking the disabled person is off-limits.
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    edited May 21
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