TSA Security Screening

BrittanyFrankBrittanyFrank Posts: 53Moderator Moderator
10 Comments 5 Awesomes Name Dropper 5 Likes
I've flown over 100 times since I've been injured & typically have a reasonable experience. But recently I had a negative experience where the TSA agent threatened to not let me through, told me I was acting like a 2 year old and was asking me to do things that I was physically unable to do. There seems to be inconsistency with the screening process across the United State How do you handle TSA screenings & pat downs? What are our rights and how can we make the screening process more universal across the country? 

Comments

  • BrookeUBrookeU Posts: 176Moderator Moderator
    100 Comments 25 Awesomes 25 Likes Photogenic
    When traveling with my brother, I've noticed all airports are different. The worst he was ever treated was at PDX in Portland, Oregon. They almost made us late for our flight because they were busy patting him head to toe. He always gets asked if he "can stand up at all." So at PDX, one officer literally held him in the air while the other pat him down, and his pants started to fall down a bit. My mom rushed into grab them, and they shouted at her to "step away." One time when he was a child, he was taken into a private room because they were convinced he had illegal chemicals in his shoes. Recently in Savannah, though, he had the most chill TSA experience yet. They did their jobs without seriously invading his privacy, carried on a real conversation with him throughout, and didn't cast any judgment. I've always been curious as to why every airport is different.
  • BrittanyFrankBrittanyFrank Posts: 53Moderator Moderator
    10 Comments 5 Awesomes Name Dropper 5 Likes
    Yes, they are all so different. But I've found what it really comes down to is the individual performing the screening. Individuals make all the difference. The organization as a whole always repeats the same screening verbiage, but then it's how they speak and treat you as a human being that can make of break an experience with TSA.

    I had an agent ask me to remove my seat cushion, while I was sitting on it without offering any chair to transfer to or any help and so when I told them I was unable to do that they threatened me and told me that they can deny me the right to travel and told me I was acting like a 2 year old when I was crying trying to figure out what to do. Has anyone else had unreasonable request? And how have you dealt with them in understanding your abilities and what you are and aren't physically able to do?
  • BrookeUBrookeU Posts: 176Moderator Moderator
    100 Comments 25 Awesomes 25 Likes Photogenic
    My brother has had many unreasonable requests (similar to what happened to you) that perpetuate the idea of ableism. He hasn't flown without my mom or me before since it's usually family trips, and the pattern of reacting to ridiculousness usually goes: Chris is upset but too polite to say anything, my mom or I (both pretty feisty women) gets firm with the person, they're rude to us, THEN Chris shows his anger (because they messed with his mom and his sister ON TOP of being awful in the first place). That's how pretty much every situation goes.

    As far as how it's affected Chris in understanding his abilities, he knows exactly what he can and can't do (he's been injured for almost 23 years now). He just gets tired of having to rehash what he can't do and usually has to spell it out to people almost like he's talking to a child. I know it's painful for him to have to say out loud "I can't do ____" when people make an unrealistic request of him.
  • BrittanyFrankBrittanyFrank Posts: 53Moderator Moderator
    10 Comments 5 Awesomes Name Dropper 5 Likes
    @BrookeU yes, it seems emotions quickly escalate when you're trying to advocate for yourself or family members. And the whole explanation or what one can or can't do can very exhausting especially if you travel often. 
  • BrookeUBrookeU Posts: 176Moderator Moderator
    100 Comments 25 Awesomes 25 Likes Photogenic
    I want to add something! I was with my friend the other day, and her dad works fairly high up at Delta. I was telling her about a situation from a few years ago when a flight attendant tried to deny my brother a water bottle so he could empty his catheter (on a cross-country flight, I might add). My friend said to DEFINITELY report these kinds of things, including the name of the employee, because action will actually be taken in talking with the employee!
Sign In or Register to comment.