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Things To Do While Quarantined

WAGSofSCIWAGSofSCI Moderator Posts: 384 Moderator
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Hello Everyone

We hope everyone is staying safe and healthy during this troubling time.

We wanted to post something light and helpful during this time when most of us are self quarantined... what else is there to do while at home? Im sure most of us have watched everything on our Netflix watch list by now so here are some other creative wheelchair friendly ideas to do alone or in a couple while at home:

- learn a new language: there are so many apps and programs available now online! Try something new, now is the perfect time to learn that language you've always wanted to learn!
- organize and clean: if you're a lower level injury or a caregiver/WAG of SCI, now is the time for those DIY cleaning and organizing project you've been putting off! 
- Feng Shui your entire home! Google this to get the details :) its fun and creates a better space for everyone!
- Download Masterclass and get learning! So much information available on this app, all in video form with a course for everyone!
- get good at an online game or learn Poker!
- read a new and hot book that has been on your list. Most books are available for download onto your device now.
- document and journal your experience 
- document and journal your LIFE experience OR write that book you've always wanted to write on your journey!!! With all the self publishing and website tools available now, the sky is the limit and people want to hear your story!

What other ideas do you guys have for keeping busy while at home?

-Brooke
WAGS of SCI
Your WAGS of SCI
(Elena and Brooke)

Comments

  • JHPRCJHPRC Moderator, Information Specialist Posts: 42 Information Specialist
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    I have been journaling a lot just to get my thoughts out either on the computer or in a book.

    Getting outside for fresh air is helpful too even if you are just hanging out in your backyard or on your patio or balcony. 

    Online shopping cause hey... we are cooped up may as well treat yourself  :)


  • SterlionSterlion Moderator Posts: 101 Moderator
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    That’s a really great list of activities! I have actually started doing most of those things already, so boredom hasn’t hit me yet. 

    I would add connect with family and friends who you haven’t spoke to in a while. Preferably video chatting. 
  • AskNurseLindaAskNurseLinda Moderator, Information Specialist Posts: 108 Information Specialist
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    Explore the world through your computer. Many of the world's greatest art museums have virtual tours that are fabulous. Nurse Linda

    I'm online in this community every Wednesday from 8-9 PM ET to answer your SCI and paralysis related questions.

    Leave a comment any time below. Let's get the discussion going!

    Nurse Linda

    Register for my next webchat! Sign up here!

  • BrittanyFrankBrittanyFrank Moderator Posts: 65 Moderator
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    I loved all those ideas and haha online shopping @JHPRC. I've heard there's online Catan as well. Getting outside is still an option too, plus spring is around the corner!
  • stephanie426stephanie426 Moderator Posts: 46 Moderator
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    I've been:

    - teaching my dog new tricks
    - writing emails with my niece in 3rd grade to help her with reading/ writing skills in a fun way
    - working from home 
    - going on lots of rolls with my dog
    - cooking new things based on what I've found in my freezer
    - I cleaned my fridge (eek!)
    - reworked our household budget (in light of anticipating many things changing)
    - had video dinners with friends

    I love your suggestions and hope to see even more!!
  • AskNurseLindaAskNurseLinda Moderator, Information Specialist Posts: 108 Information Specialist
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    I really like the idea of helping and connecting with your niece. Good for both of you and her parents.  Nurse Linda

    I'm online in this community every Wednesday from 8-9 PM ET to answer your SCI and paralysis related questions.

    Leave a comment any time below. Let's get the discussion going!

    Nurse Linda

    Register for my next webchat! Sign up here!

  • ZcollieZcollie Moderator Posts: 239 Moderator
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    Thanks for sharing all of those ideas! Downloading Masterclass right now (: 
    Accept what is, let go of what was, and have faith in what will be. -SONIA RICOTTI
  • simone432simone432 Member Posts: 2
    First Comment
    A proofreading software is crucial for the people who deal with digital writing like copywriters, bloggers & e-book authors. In this comprehensive article, I am going to compare two potential proofreading software— Grammarly vs Ginger.
  • CarlosXavierCarlosXavier Member Posts: 2
    First Comment
    In the last days I have read 2 books that I liked a lot. One of these was Brida, since I am a lover of fantasy. It has helped me a lot to get through these difficult days
  • CruckerCrucker Moderator Posts: 76 Moderator
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    Things to do during while quarantined.  Try nothing. I'm serious. Read on, please. This is one of the most popular blogs I've ever written, called "Life in the Age of COVID-19"

    Here I am, sitting at home with nothing to do, except trying to write this piece about sitting at home with nothing to do. Plus, I have a nasty head cold, which makes even thinking straight difficult. You can only sleep so much, darn the luck, or watch only so many breathless CNN “Breaking News” reports, or read online world COVID-19 statistics, or check your email hoping that it’s more than cancellation notices, or miracle ketone diet ads. Of course, there is that new, 1000-page Tudor novel you can dive into, but it’s hard to concentrate when the whole world is falling apart.

    You are, in a word, idle, and if you grew up in a middle American Calvinist household like I did, idle is an unspoken four-letter word, meaning useless, lazy, and not invited to dinner. “Idle hands are the devil’s workshop” is tattooed on your frontal lobe. “‘Do something,’ you worthless troll!” your brain screams, “before God writes you off as unnecessary and gives you the virus!”

    On the other hand, or so I am told, there is an art to doing nothing, a learnable skill set, apparently, if not a lifestyle. The Italians have a word for this -- “La Dolce Far Niente,” or “the sweetness of doing nothing.” You know, old Italian men sitting around the piazza, drinking wine and making obscene hand gestures to one another. The French are good at this, too. The Danes have their own form of do-nothingness, called “hygge,” meaning sitting around in sweatpants and just being cozy.

    My own first instinct in a moment of idleness is to make a list of all the things I should be doing outside of “real work” to better my life. You’ve made the same list. “Exercise. Check. Meditate. Check. Learn to play the piano. Check. Call your mom. Later.” Those are all good things to do, for sure, but none of them fit the category of “nothing.” They are just better “should’s” than “finish quarterly revenue projections” or “check LinkedIn for better job.”

    My second instinct is to look up “doing nothing” on Google. Seems pathetic, right, that I can’t do nothing without someone online telling me how to do nothing. But it doesn’t take long to research and there are a hundred entries. I’ll only refer to one good one from the New York Times from May of 2019. It had the most arresting title: “Stop. Just Stop. And Learn How to Do Absolutely Nothing.”

    The article is built around another European catchword, this one from the Dutch. The word is “niksen.” The idea of “niksen” “is to take conscious, considered time and energy to do activities like gazing out a window or sitting motionless.” I know, your mom called that frittering your life away. The Dutch would probably say, in a polite way, that your mom was full of baloney, or whatever lunch meat is popular over there.

    Another source explains that “doing nothing is actually an event in and of itself.” It is not just negative time between focused and “important” tasks like doing push-ups or watching Sports Center.

    The irony of all of this is that, according to “niksen” experts, a period of total, dedicated idleness can be incredibly productive! When your mind is free of on-demand tasks or the next list of worries, creative ideas tend to appear out of nowhere. Or your neck relaxes, your shoulders drop, and the solution to a difficult problem just effortlessly occurs. Or your brain starts singing “What A Day for A Daydream” by the Lovin’ Spoonfuls. Lord only knows what else is rolling around in there.

    “Nothing” is clearly not an easy thing to do. You have been programmed your whole life to do stuff. It’s your mantra: “I do stuff, therefore I am.” I’m just a beginner here at the art of “niksen” and I can attest that it feels uncomfortable, almost silly, in the early stages. You have to ease into it.

    Try this: the next time you are sitting in a doctor’s office, waiting to be called in, don’t check your iPhone for email or thumb through some celebrity rag or plan the dinner menu. Just sit there. Be idle. Be very idle.

    Over time, you may learn to really like it and stop working altogether because it cuts into your “niksen/hygge/far-niente time”. “Niksening” may become so addictive that you wake up one day, broke and homeless, and are inspired to write a piece for the New York Times called “Get Off Your Tail, Pal! Idleness Can Ruin Your Life!” Your mom will be so proud.

    Allen Rucker






  • ZcollieZcollie Moderator Posts: 239 Moderator
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    I have been playing a lot of Call of Duty Mobile haha
    Accept what is, let go of what was, and have faith in what will be. -SONIA RICOTTI
  • ambercollieambercollie Moderator Posts: 137 Moderator
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    @Crucker I loved that post about try doing Nothing! I totally suffer from the habit of Do Something! Else I don’t feel good about myself. Many of us over due it most of the time, here is a rare forced opportunity to actually slow down. It’s harder than it seems though, but will keep trying! Thanks.
  • CruckerCrucker Moderator Posts: 76 Moderator
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    To @Akexkhan and @Ambercollie.  Thanks so much for your kind comments re "The Fine Art of Doing  Nothing." When you stop thinking about the next item on your endless to-do list, all kinds of valuable thought/actions can effortlessly enter your mind, like taking a deep breath or two, the gateway to more serious meditation, or feeling overwhelming gratitude to all you've been given, or maybe become aware of the negative self-talk that rumbles around most of our heads most of the time. While your conscious mind is gazing out the window, your subconscious mind is free to roam. If it roams into some sphere of fear or anxiety, stop and see why. They don't always magically disappear by seeing them, but at least you become more aware that they are self-generated. After all, you are just sitting and staring.

    Thanks again for your responses. I appreciate it. Allen R
  • CruckerCrucker Moderator Posts: 76 Moderator
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    Here's another way to approach the quarantine, especially if you are alone in a small apartment and are feeling lonely and isolated, which is easy to do during this weird period. It's called "Mastery":

    When I first became paralyzed in 1996, I felt like I had hit rock bottom. My career was virtually non-existent, or at best dull and laborious, the family finances were in free fall, and then – ta-da! – I can’t move from T-10 down. I sat in that hospital bed for hours on end, staring at the ceiling, numb, confused, and scared. When people came by, I worked at putting on a cheery face, but the minute they left, I was back in the void. I was paralyzed in more ways than just my legs.

    It was clear what I had to learn in those first days: how to function as a paralytic. This required effort, focus, and a positive feedback loop. It took me hours to learn to sit on the edge of the bed without falling over. (Balance is not one of my strong suits.) And then all the “activities of daily living” most people who are reading this know all about. At one rehab session I made a chocolate cake from a mix. I thought it was a singular achievement. My wife thought my giddiness was a sign of early-onset senility. Looking out over lake in wheelchair

    Only later did I realize what was really going on with all these baby steps. I was learning to “master” paralysis. I was actually doing something, mostly on my own, and slowly getting better at it. And I was doing it for no one else but me! These seemingly small victories began to alter my outlook on everything. I stopped whining to myself that I was broken and useless. Through some kind of subconscious osmosis, I started building confidence that if I could lick the rudiments of paralysis, I could probably lick all those other, mostly self-made problems that a few weeks before seemed insurmountable.

    Apparently this idea of mastery was talked about a lot during the Victorian Age, when for the first time in history, middle-class people had leisure time to fill. You practice any activity at which you have no previous level of expertise, experiencing gradual improvement over time. The psychological benefits follow.

    I got that definition from a recent New York Times article on the value of mastery in an age of home confinement. Rather than sitting around doing utterly passive time-fillers like binge-watching the first season of “Parks and Rec” or surfing the news feed on Facebook, you decide to put all digital devices in a drawer and turn to something that you always wanted to do, and learn, and set out to get better at it.

    A professor quoted in the article summed it up nicely: “the ability to generate activities by yourself for yourself, that is a real asset.” That doesn’t mean writing a novel or learning to be a ballet dancer. It means doing something manageable where you can see your progress in much less time that the 10,000 hours that author Malcolm Gladwell posits as the effort it takes to reach true expertise. Yeah, if you want to master Bach’s Six Cello Suites, but what if you desire to learn to do something much simpler that also provides pleasure and even fulfillment?

    Like what, you ask? Like finding images you like, from any source, and putting together a collage. The Victorians loved to do that, simply for the creative release. As one amateur collager commented, “You’re just sticking stuff down and whatever happens, happens. It’s relaxing.” Another collage maker I came across called it “freeing.” The more you do, the more artful your collages.

    The article talks about people who like to press flowers in old timey flower presses, make natural dyes to dye stuff, or learn to play the harp. They would be called Living Victorians, kind of like a homey version of Civil War reenactors. You might want to learn all the countries in Africa or how to draw a horse. There is nothing, by the way, that you can’t find explained in a tutorial on YouTube. I came across a dozen of them on how to get mold off your washing machine door. Then again, maybe home repair is not something that excites your creative juices.

    Remember, you are doing this by yourself for yourself. You judge if it is fun to do or gives you a measure of satisfaction. You judge if you are making progress. If so, you are on the road to a form of mastery to which we all aspire: self-mastery.

    Now, who wants to press some ferns?

    Allen Rucker was born in Wichita Falls, Texas, raised in Bartlesville, Oklahoma, and has an MA in Communication from Stanford University, an MA in American Culture from the University of Michigan, and a BA in English from Washington University, St. Louis.


  • AskNurseLindaAskNurseLinda Moderator, Information Specialist Posts: 108 Information Specialist
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    I really enjoy your posts! Nurse Linda

    I'm online in this community every Wednesday from 8-9 PM ET to answer your SCI and paralysis related questions.

    Leave a comment any time below. Let's get the discussion going!

    Nurse Linda

    Register for my next webchat! Sign up here!

  • ambercollieambercollie Moderator Posts: 137 Moderator
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